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Delanerolle G., Mccauley M., Hirsch M., Zeng Y., Cong X., Cavalini H., Shetty A., Rathod S., Shi J. Q., Hapangama D. K., Phiri P.

18
Jun 14, 2022
Medrxiv
DOI :
10.1101/2022.06.13.22276327
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Background Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV) is a respiratory disease causing coronavirus. SARS-CoV has caused the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), SARS-CoV in Hong King and SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19). COVID-19, to date, have had the highest mortality and morbidity globally, thus reaching the pandemic status. In comparison to research conducted to explore the impact of pandemics on the general wellbeing, there appears to be a paucity on its association with womens mental health. Many pregnant women have reported that the pandemic negatively impacted their mental health. AimThis study aimed is to explore the prevalence of the impact of the COVID-19, MERS and SARS pandemics on the mental health of pregnant women.
Method A study protocol was developed and published in PROSPERO (CRD42021235356) to explore a number of key objectives. For the purpose of this study PubMed, Science direct, Ovid PsycINFO and EMBASE databases were searched from December 2000 - July 2021. The search results were screened, first by title, and then by abstract. A meta-analysis was conducted to report the findings.
Result There were no studies reporting the mental health impact due to MERS and SARS. We systematically identified 316 studies that reported on the mental health of women that were pregnant and soon after birth. The meta-analysis indicated 24.9% (21.37%-29.02%) of pregnant women reported symptoms of depression, 32.8% (29.05% to 37.21%) anxiety, 29.44% (18.21% - 47.61%) stress, 27.93% (9.05%-86.15 %) PTSD, and 24.38% (11.89%-49.96%) sleep disorders during the COVID-19 pandemic. Furthermore, the I2 test showed a high heterogeneity value.
Conclusion The importance of managing the mental health during pregnancy and after-delivery improves the quality of life and wellbeing of mothers. Developing an evidence based mental health framework as part of pandemic preparedness to help pregnant women would improve the quality of care received during challenging times.

Figure
The prevalence of mental ill-health in women during pregnancy and after childbirth during the Covid-19 pandemic: a Systematic review and Meta-analysis
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